Paper > Paper > Using WT-200 to study moving distances and havitat use of juvenile Black-faced Spoonbills in the border area of South Korea

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  Using WT-200 to study moving distances and havitat use of juvenile Black-faced Spoonbills in the border area of South Korea
  Writer : KOECO     Date : 16-03-17 11:45     Count : 1205    
   2015-Using_GPS-Mobile_Based_Telemetry__WT-200__to_Study_Moving_Distances_and_Habitat_Use_of_Juvenile_Bl··.pdf (2.3M), Down : 20, 2016-03-18 13:00:27

Using WT-200 to study moving distances and havitat use of juvenile Black-faced Spoonbills in the border area of South Korea


Abstract


This study was conducted at the major breeding sites of Black-faced Spoonbills, specifically Guji Island, Bi Island and Sangyeobawi, which are located around the border areas on the west coast of South Korea. This study utilized GPS-Mobile based Telemetry (WT-200) in order to measure the moving distance between breeding and feeding sites and to identify the usage of the feeding sites. During the study period, the total number of adult Black-faced Spoonbills was 760, of which 400 were found on Guji Island, 240 on Bi Island, and 120 on Sangyeonbawi. The number of the breeding population was more than it had been in the past. Nine juvenile individuals were tagged with GPS-Mobile based Telemetry and released. They were later spotted around Yonan-gun and Ongjin-gun in North Korea, and also on the mud flats of Ganghwa Island in South Korea, all of which are primary foraging areas. The average distance between the feeding and the breeding sites is 15.9± 11.3km (n=8). The maximum travel distance is 27.9km and the moving average distance is 2.1±0.9 km (n=8). A total of 798 GPS reception coordinate points showed that the mud flat was the most frequently used foraging area (62.0%), followed by shallow open waters (29.9%), reservoirs (4.5%), rice fields (1.9%), and streams (1.6%).


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